How many times per week should older adults lift weights?

There is no doubt in the exercise science and health world that strength training (a.k.a. weight training or resistance training) is beneficial for older adults. In addition to increasing overall strength, it prevents bone and muscle wasting as you age. This is particularly important for older women. Women are at a higher risk of developing conditions such as sarcopenia (low muscle mass that increases risk of becoming dependent) and osteoporosis (low bone mineral density that increases risk of fractures) than men. In other words, they are more likely to require assistance to conduct activities of daily living such as cleaning, cooking and washing themselves, than are men. This is one of the reasons we see more women living in assisted living facilities (nursing homes) than men. Luckily, women can prevent this loss of independence if they routinely participate in strength training. While there are guidelines available on what you should do, there is some debate over “how much” you need to do to reap these health and fitness gains.

A recent study conducted by Farinatti et al. in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research set out to determine the difference in benefits from training once a week compared to training twice or even three times per week. Women over the age of 60 participated in 16 weeks of strength training and completed fitness assessments both before and after this training program. The training program consisted of 8-12 repetitions of 10 exercises conducted at an intensity of 60-80% of maximum measured strength. Only one set of these exercises was conducted at each session and weight (loads) was increased by 5% when the participant was able to perform more than 12 repetitions. Thus overall, participants who were in the group that exercised once per week conducted 8-12 repetitions of each of the 10 exercises at a weight that caused their muscles to fatigue completely.  Those in twice weekly and three times weekly groups did this same exercise routine on one or two other days of the week. The authors found that generally, more was better. When looking at gains in strength, those who exercised three times per week had the greatest gains. Furthermore, those in the group who exercised three times per week also had the greatest gains in functional fitness. However, it should be noted that ALL GROUPS had significant improvements in strength and functional fitness i.e. just one set of high intensity strength training per week led to significant gains in strength and thus health!

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: As we age we lose muscle mass and increase our risk of becoming dependent on others. In order to maintain our independence it is essential to include strength training in our weekly exercise program. Research indicates that one set of 8-12 repetitions of high intensity strength training is sufficient to improve strength and functional fitness, but that doing this on 2 or even 3 days of the week will lead to greater benefit. So, if you are crunched for time be sure to include at least one set of high intensity strength training to your weekly routine. If muscle loss is of concern to you, do your strength training exercises 3 days/week. Remember, strength training is essential in ensuring your HALF!

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Pole Dancing…I mean Pole Walking is good for your health!

Well, pole dancing is probably good for your health too, but in this article I will be focusing on the health benefits of pole walking a.k.a Nordic walking or Nordic pole walking. If you’ve ever seen someone out for a walk with ski poles in their hands, you’ve witnessed Nordic walking. You might wonder why they have these poles in their hands. The short answer is that Nordic walking is a much more effective way to improve health than standard walking. Adding poles to a standard walk allows you to walk faster and also allows you to engage the muscles of the upper body; muscles often neglected in a standard walk. This form of walking has been shown to be especially beneficial to those with type 2 diabetes, people who have arthritis and of course to those hoping to lose weight.

A recently published intervention among overweight adults with varying levels of blood glucose control (normal, impaired and type 2 diabetes) assessed the benefit of unsupervised Nordic Walking among middle-aged and older adults. The researchers randomly assigned participants to either a control group (i.e. no exercise changes) or a Nordic walking group. The Nordic walking group was instructed to increase their weekly physical activity levels by 5 hours per week for 4 months using the Nordic poles. They attended an instructional class and were explained what intensity range they should walk within. At the end of the 4 months the Nordic walking had differing effects in the three groups. In the group with normal blood glucose levels body weight and waist size (waist circumference) both improved significantly. In the groups with impaired blood glucose levels, exercise capacity and physical fitness levels improved significantly. Finally, in the diabetes group, blood glucose levels and exercise capacity improved significantly. Another noteworthy finding was that those in the Nordic walking groups increased their weekly physical activity levels by 4-5 hours per week in each of the three groups. This is great news as it seems that Nordic walking is an activity that overweight individuals enjoyed and therefore were able to stick with!

It appears that one simple addition or change to your walking routine can have a fairly significant influence on your health and fitness levels. While it wasn’t assessed in the study described above, and research certainly is limited in this area, I can say from personal experience that Nordic walking can lead to improvements in muscular endurance of the upper and lower body as well as increase the speed with which you can walk. All in all, it is a great way to increase the intensity of your walking and a great way to derive greater health benefits while spending the same amount of time being active. If you are interested in learning how to walk with Nordic poles please check the following website for instructors and groups in your area: http://nordixx.com/find-a-walking-group/

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Adding some Nordic poles to your walk can lead to significant improvements in your health and fitness levels. Be sure to give it a try, but make sure you learn the proper form before purchasing a pair of poles. This will ensure you prevent injuries and that you maximize the benefits derived from the activity. This activity is particularly beneficial if you are trying to lose weight, have diabetes or cardiovascular disease or arthritis. So be sure to give it a try and see if a simple pair of poles can help you get closer to your HALF!

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