Pole Dancing…I mean Pole Walking is good for your health!

Well, pole dancing is probably good for your health too, but in this article I will be focusing on the health benefits of pole walking a.k.a Nordic walking or Nordic pole walking. If you’ve ever seen someone out for a walk with ski poles in their hands, you’ve witnessed Nordic walking. You might wonder why they have these poles in their hands. The short answer is that Nordic walking is a much more effective way to improve health than standard walking. Adding poles to a standard walk allows you to walk faster and also allows you to engage the muscles of the upper body; muscles often neglected in a standard walk. This form of walking has been shown to be especially beneficial to those with type 2 diabetes, people who have arthritis and of course to those hoping to lose weight.

A recently published intervention among overweight adults with varying levels of blood glucose control (normal, impaired and type 2 diabetes) assessed the benefit of unsupervised Nordic Walking among middle-aged and older adults. The researchers randomly assigned participants to either a control group (i.e. no exercise changes) or a Nordic walking group. The Nordic walking group was instructed to increase their weekly physical activity levels by 5 hours per week for 4 months using the Nordic poles. They attended an instructional class and were explained what intensity range they should walk within. At the end of the 4 months the Nordic walking had differing effects in the three groups. In the group with normal blood glucose levels body weight and waist size (waist circumference) both improved significantly. In the groups with impaired blood glucose levels, exercise capacity and physical fitness levels improved significantly. Finally, in the diabetes group, blood glucose levels and exercise capacity improved significantly. Another noteworthy finding was that those in the Nordic walking groups increased their weekly physical activity levels by 4-5 hours per week in each of the three groups. This is great news as it seems that Nordic walking is an activity that overweight individuals enjoyed and therefore were able to stick with!

It appears that one simple addition or change to your walking routine can have a fairly significant influence on your health and fitness levels. While it wasn’t assessed in the study described above, and research certainly is limited in this area, I can say from personal experience that Nordic walking can lead to improvements in muscular endurance of the upper and lower body as well as increase the speed with which you can walk. All in all, it is a great way to increase the intensity of your walking and a great way to derive greater health benefits while spending the same amount of time being active. If you are interested in learning how to walk with Nordic poles please check the following website for instructors and groups in your area: http://nordixx.com/find-a-walking-group/

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Adding some Nordic poles to your walk can lead to significant improvements in your health and fitness levels. Be sure to give it a try, but make sure you learn the proper form before purchasing a pair of poles. This will ensure you prevent injuries and that you maximize the benefits derived from the activity. This activity is particularly beneficial if you are trying to lose weight, have diabetes or cardiovascular disease or arthritis. So be sure to give it a try and see if a simple pair of poles can help you get closer to your HALF!


Is your diabetes related to air pollution?

We’ve all heard that air pollution is bad for our health. But most people, myself included, assume that we are talking about respiratory health i.e. asthma or emphysema. The truth is, air pollution can be detrimental to cardiovascular and metabolic health too. In fact, a growing amount of research is finding that there may be an association between air pollution and type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is on the rise in western countries and is slowly becoming one of the greatest health concerns worldwide. It is primarily a result of poor lifestyle and is considered a preventable disease. However, there are some risk factors (such as genetics and age) that are not in our control. A recent study published in Diabetes Care (Andersen et al. 2012) and conducted by a group of scientists in Denmark found that air pollution may be another one of those factors. The authors used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health database and from national health registries to determine whether traffic-related air pollution levels and the risk for diabetes in the elderly are related. They found a weak and positive association between diabetes and air pollution. This means that higher levels of air pollution were associated with a higher risk of diabetes, particularly among those who were non-smokers or who were physically active. While the association in this study was weak, there is other evidence to suggest that this association indeed exists. For example, a recent study found that traffic-related air pollution is associated with death from diabetes (Raaschou-Nielsen O et al. Diabetologia 2012), while others have found that those with diabetes have worse outcomes when exposed to higher levels of air pollution (O’Neill et al. Circulation 2005).

It seems then that air pollution may be another risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The question is, is it a risk factor we can control or a risk factor that is out of our control?  Well, I would like to think it is one we can control, not just at the individual level, but one that our governments can do a great deal about as well. If air pollution is leading to an increase in the prevalence of chronic conditions, then it is a public health issue. The government should opt for clean and green energy solutions and make green choices more affordable for the general population. This could lead to significant savings in health care expenditure as well as a significant improvement in our quality of life.

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Type 2 diabetes is preventable and in some cases, reversible; particularly if you have a HALF. However, there are some factors that may be out of our our control and require action from our government. If you live in an area with high levels of air pollution, write to your local officials and let them know that your health is on the line! While we can all do our part at being green, we need significant changes in air pollution levels to ensure we can all maintain our HALF!